Using The Dremel Shaper/router Table And Conclusion | Bit-tech.net

Dremel Shaper / Router Table Review Using the Dremel Shaper/Router Table and Conclusion

The main limitation of the table is its size, which will limit the length of materials you can easily pass by/over the cutting/sanding bit. Click to enlarge Using sanding bands proved to be a doddle and we were able to achieve smooth curves on the corners of acrylic sheet much easier than with a rotary tool alone or with the Dremel Workstation. With soft materials, it was quick and easy to shave off a specific amount off one edge, while routing bits were able to deal with harder materials.
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7 New Workshop Routers: Comparison Test and Buyer’s Guide – Popular Mechanics

Enter the compact electric motor, and it wasn’t long before those many tools were replaced by one: a high-speed milling machine called a router. With interchangeable bits, it was used to cut a wide range of profiles, plus it handled curved edges and internal cuts, all at a fraction of the time it once took. Today, there are two kinds of routers: the original fixed-base design that handles edge molding, dadoes and rabbets, and a plunging version that’s better for internal cuts.
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