Router Table Features Laminated Cabinet Functionality., Bosch Power Tools & Acc

Build This Simple Router Jig and Mill Your Own Molding On-Site – Fine Homebuilding

Additionally, a dual outlet switch and a 6-foot cord eliminate the need to reach under the table after initial set up. A lock prevents unauthorized use. And the cabinet style improves dust control with ports on both the fence and in the cabinet. A 25 by 15-1/2-inch smooth laminated top offers an expanded smooth work surface for precision woodworking projects.
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6 Workshop Router Secrets: DIY Guy – Popular Mechanics

Plunge Routers Go Where No Other Router Can The plunge router deserves a place in every shop. Routing chores, such as mortising, stopped dados and inlay pattern work, are safer and easier to perform using a plunge router. Its unique base allows the motor housing to ride up and down on a pair of posts fixed to the base. The plunge mechanism is spring-loaded so the motor housing always wants to spring up to the top of the posts. A lock/release lever allows free up-and-down movement of the router housing or locks it in place at a given depth. The depth of cut can be preset, allowing you to position the router over the work and plunge the bit to an exact depth. The depth stop works much like the stop does on a drill press.
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8 Great Reasons to Own a Plunge Router – DIY – MOTHER EARTH NEWS

Sure, a cordless drill or circular saw might get more use, but no tool can compete with a router when it comes to diversity. With this one compact tool you can shape decorative edges, form raised panels, cut grooves and slots, carve signs, make moldings, rout intricate inlays, trim plastic laminate and veneers and mill dozens of woodworking joints, including rabbets, dovetails and mortises, to name a few. And while the router is handheld for most operations, it can also be mounted in a router table , creating a small stationary shaper. Here are six router tips divided by experience level: practicing these techniques will help you get the most out of your router while expanding your woodworking skills. By Joe Truini
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hole that is offset from the center of the groove. This hole accommodates the router bit, and it should be to the left of the groove as you face the jig. This is to ensurethat the router bit, which turns clockwise, will be turning into the work as you feed the stock into it. Next, I bored a similar hole in the top of my job-site workbench to allow the wood chips an escape route. I positioned my router over the hole in the jig and anchored the router to the table with a pair of clamps. The clamps were arranged on opposite sides of the router’s base, in line with the groove in the 2x stock. By sightingdown the groove I could easily adjust the router, both vertically and horizontally, until I had the bit in the exact position that I needed for the molding profile.
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