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Japanese Woodworker News:

Traditional Japanese Architecture, Design & Woodworking. East Wind …

We design and build traditional Japanese houses. Japanese architecture, design, consultation, construction, finished materials.

Original Source: http://eastwindinc.com/

Japan Woodworker – Japanese Woodworking Tools & Supplies …

For over 30 years, Japan Woodworker has imported professional quality woodworking tools, fine cutlery and garden tools from Japan.

Original Source: http://www.japanwoodworker.com/

Traditional Japanese Architecture, Design & Woodworking. East Wind …

We design and build traditional Japanese houses. Japanese architecture, design, consultation, construction, finished materials.

Original Source: http://eastwindinc.com/

The Japan Woodworker – CLOSED – Alameda, CA

(510) 521-1810 ยท “What a bummer!! Japan Woodworker was my favorite tool source. Staff was always helpful and pleasant.”

Original Source: http://www.yelp.com/biz/the-japan-woodworker-alameda

Japan Woodworker – Japanese Woodworking Tools & Supplies …

For over 30 years, Japan Woodworker has imported professional quality woodworking tools, fine cutlery and garden tools from Japan.

Original Source: http://www.japanwoodworker.com/


Kyoto Joinery 1/2

This video examines in detail the production of Kyoto Joinery. Part of The Traditional Crafts of Japan series: exploring the 23 wood crafts centers of Japan.


Q&A:

jimwes asked Who invented the rocking chair and how long has it been used?

And got the following answer:

History of Rocking Chairs

A rocking chair is appropriate for any American Girl Doll of European descent. One of the first rocking chairs ever made was in Sweden around 1740. It was called a gungstol. It had a long, curved piece of wood for the rocker and six legs. These six legged rocking chairs were made until about 1870 when four legged rocking chairs began to be made. Gungstols were often painted black and decorated with gold outlining. To make your American Girl Doll furniture look authentic for this period, you might paint it black with gold outlining.

A bow-spindle-backed rocking chair also originated in England around 1740. It was called the Windsor Rocker. It was used as a lawn chair rather than as furniture for the home. The Windsor Rocker was brought to the American Colonies around 1750 and the crafty Americans made many variations. It is the American versions of the rocking chair became famous around the world. Any type of natural-colored wood stain and finish (such as light oak, cherry or walnut) would make your American Girl Doll furniture look authentic for this period.

Many people believe that Benjamin Franklin invented the rocking chair by placing rockers on the legs of a straight chair. But this is not true. However, like so many writers, artists and politicians of the day, he did own one.

Hand-crafted furniture has been a large part of American history. I like the philosophy of the American-born Japanese woodworking designer George Nakashima. He said, “The woodworker’s responsibility is to the tree itself, which has been sacrificed to live again in the woodworker’s hands…” Hand-crafting American Girl Doll furniture for your loved is one of the most thoughtful and cherished gifts they will ever receive. –

Arielle asked Where can i get a kotatsu style table, but without the heater? (in america)?

I always seem to end up sitting on the floor instead of my study desk and i find that kotatsu tables seem to be lower than regular coffee tables so they’re easier to work with.
I live in america and i find it hard to find a kotatsu without the heater.

And got the following answer:

Maybe you can get an ordinary coffee table converted to a kotatsu table by a local woodworker/ cabinetmaker/ furniture maker.

How I’d turn a coffee table or some such into a kotatsu table:

I’d determine how high you want the top to be in relation to the floor.
Suppose that is 13″/ 330mm.
I’d measure the height of the coffee table: mine happens to be 16″/ 406.4mm.
Then I would cut of 3″ PLUS the thickness of a new plywood top PLUS a small amount to account for the thickness of the cloth in the fabric skirt / ‘futon’ off the 4 legs.

If I used a new 1/2″ plywood top and needed 1/4″ for the futon, I’d cut 3 5/8″ off each leg, then sand the high leg’s ‘foot’ until the table sat on the floor without rocking.

The top would be screwed onto the coffee table from underneath, with the futon placed between the old top and the new one.

And it would be done.

**********
Another way to do this would be to just cut 3″ off the legs then make some short 1 x 2″ strips to place underneath the existing table top to hold the fabric in place..

Actually, that will be better because you won’t have to buy plywood or get the plywood for the new top varnished.

If you buy a Ryobi-type pull saw ( a “Japanese” style saw, which costs about $25 now) you can do this yourself. I just happened to buy a new one from Home Depot a few days ago, a Stanley (brand) Fat Max pull saw. See a photo of one here:
http://tinyurl.com/9hqkv2x

Alternately, you can take the photo of a kotatsu table you like to a furniture maker and have him or her make you one from scratch.

anon asked I had this idea to make a kokeshi doll for a friend as a gift. I’m not a woodworker. Any starter hints?

I don’t really have experience working with wood, but I can learn pretty fast. Are there cylindrical pieces of wood I can buy. Do any place offer lathe services. any recommendations on getting this done. The goal is to make a japanese kokeshi doll that looks like a friend of mine. The hardest part will probably be the painting. But i can figure that out. The wood is the thing I don’t have direct supplies or tools for.

And got the following answer:

try ebay