Does The Internet Need “governance”?

The Net Neutrality Debate Explained – Yahoo News

But that is clearly wrong for a simple reason: the government created the monopolies! So the government is responsible for the curtailment of free speech and free assembly by its monopolies. That includes monopolies at the level of Towns, Cities, States, and other jurisdictions in the US the constitutional rights bar those governments from mucking with speech and assembly rights. And this principle goes beyond America many (if not most) countries guarantee freedom of speech and assembly, and most, if not all, countries grant monopoly rights to communications carriers. This could be easily solved with a simple law: any company that handles Internet datagrams may not read or modify the content, nor infer intent or meaning for the purpose of deciding what datagrams to deliver or to not deliver. That’s a pretty simple principle, and it happens also to be the design principle behind the Internet, and what has made it work.
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This is pretty much the exact opposite of network neutrality and, to unabashedly quote Douglas Adams, has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely considered a bad move. At the most recent count, the FCC had received 3.9 million comments on its proposed piece of legislation. The widespread protest against paid prioritization spurred on with help from outlets like HBOs John Oliver crashed the comments section of the FCCs website multiple times, ironically enough. President Obama this week publicly called on the FCC to reclassify broadband providers as telecommunications services, not unlike like your telephone. While this seems to counter-act the guidelines that Congress set down, bear this in mind: those guidelines are almost 20 years old. When they were enacted, people still used America Online to browse the web.
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