Craftsman Builds Furniture With Soul

Recently we put together a cabinet with figured walnut veneer; the doors have a framework that features a distinctive covering of silky horsehair. The cabinets are touch latch, and the interior has customized components for equipment below the TV. Theres a lot of modern accommodations and intricacy. The cabinet looks simple, but in reality is much harder to accomplish.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2013/08/24/craftsman-builds-furniture-with-soul/MFgfHvrGMq2W7pk0gDDbUM/story.html

Woodworking craftsman — Kluesner specializes in 18th century reproductions

0102 comm kluesner 1960.JPG

There are three common guides used in freehanded routing: Guides clamped to the workpiece (the wood being cut) that the router base moves along Guides attached to the router base that provide a “fence” that rides along the workpiece edge Guides that are part of the spinning bit itself: for example, a ball-bearing sleeve at the bottom of the bit that limits the penetration of the cutting surface. The router is capable of much more precise work when it is not used free hand, but is rather mounted upside down in a “router table.” Rather than push the router bit through the workpiece, the table lets the craftsman push the workpiece through the bit. This allows for a greater variety of guides and stops: most router tables will have a fence that can be easily repositioned to keep the workpiece edge a set number of inches from the bit, and “stops” mounted to the fence that limit workpiece travel, allowing the craftsman to make “interior cuts” such as a groove that cannot be seen from either edge. There is a very active market in third party accessories for routers and router tables. One of my favorites is the “router lift,” available in several designs from several manufacturers.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/07/16/358248/-The-Shocking-Ignorance-of-Kossacks-About-Routers

The Shocking Ignorance of Kossacks About Routers

Greene said the guitar he played is as good as it gets, and believes Kluesner did a wonderful job. The last Fender I played that Mike brought over, Greene said, is as good as anything I have ever played before. Probably as good as anything you could purchase from the Fender American Custom line. The fret work is outstanding and the same can be said about the body and neck. Even if a guitar has great electronics, it isnt a great guitar without a well-made body.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.heraldbulletin.com/peopleandplaces/x2056571565/Woodworking-craftsman-Kluesner-specializes-in-18th-century-reproductions