Connected And Smarter Products At Ces 2015 Show How Market Has Transformed, Says Imagination – Yahoo Finance

Solace Enables IBM-based Application Infrastructure to Meet Demands of Next-Generation Applications – Yahoo Finance

At CES 2015 we saw more ‘smart’ and connected products than ever before using our technologies, including a number of new IoT and wearable products as these segments begin to ramp volume. In home entertainment, CES confirmed there is an overall move toward studio-quality audio and video, migration of 4K TV to mainstream, and growing interest in 8K, along with the re-emergence of OLED as a potential volume TV display technology. These trends all point to the growing demand for Imagination’s scalable technologies and customizable platforms that enable differentiated products as well as feature and performance leadership.” Products powered by Imagination’s IP (intellectual property) cores at CES included the latest devices in Imagination’s core markets including smartphones, tablets and TVs, and a wide range of smarter connected consumer devices incorporating Imagination’s technologies for communications across both connectivity and broadcast, wireless audio, automotive and intelligent vision. An increasing number of products also combine multiple Imagination IP technologies including including PowerVR multimedia, MIPS CPUs, Ensigma connectivity, Caskeid audio, HelloSoft VoIP, and FlowCloud device-to-cloud technologies.
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Under the hood of I2P, the Tor alternative that reloaded Silk Road | Ars Technica

“IBM MQ has been a workhorse technology for more than 20 years and has been deployed by many companies across a wide range of legacy applications. Integrating Solace message routers with IBM MQ applications allows companies to meet the needs of modern applications that require streaming real-time data, big data scale, e-commerce functionality, reach to mobile devices and connectivity with the Internet of Things,” said Shawn McAllister, CTO at Solace. “Solace also provides a path for companies to upgrade the performance, improve the behavior and lower the cost of ownership of legacy applications by selectively migrating applications from MQ to Solace where it makes sense to do so.” Solace simplifies the architecture and operation of application infrastructure by providing a unified platform for SOA/ESB/JMS, mobile, desktop, REST, MQTT, and WAN distribution. Solace offers high availability through fault tolerance with consistently fast failovers, and fully-integrated replication for disaster recovery without the complexity of SAN storage replication. A pure hardware datapath ensures fast, consistent performance under all conditions, which is critical for e-commerce and other real-time applications.
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While the throughput of I2P probably isn’t enough to support voice over IP or peer-to-peer video chat, the speed of an I2P connection can be increased by applications by trading off anonymityby reducing the number of hops through routers traffic takes to get to the end destination. The number of hops required can be configured based on the user’s risk profile to add greater protection as well, adding more hops to make it more difficult to unmask the user. Trust no one Since it’s entirely peer-to-peer in structure, there’s no hard-coded trusted set of directory stores. Instead, the network directory of I2P is netDb, a distributed database that is replicated across the network. The NetDb is a distributed hash table similar to Kademlia, a peer-to-peer network developed by Petar Maymounkov and David Mazieres that was also used by LimeWire to improve the Gnutella file-sharing protocol. The netDb network database contains information on active routers (peers on the network available for routing traffic) and endpoints, such as “eepsites” and exit points to the public Internet, including their Internet location, the network port number they listen on, and their public encryption keys.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/01/under-the-hood-of-i2p-the-tor-alternative-that-reloaded-silk-road/