Build This Simple Router Jig And Mill Your Own Molding On-site – Fine Homebuilding

Using the Dremel Shaper/Router Table and Conclusion | bit-tech.net

Dremel Shaper / Router Table Review Using the Dremel Shaper/Router Table and Conclusion

I think my new method is faster, more accurate and safer than using a router table –especially if the moldings are narrow and thin. As shown in the drawing, I used a scrap of 2x stock about 1 ft. long and about the width of my router’s base. I cut a lengthwise groove near the middle of the 2x, just a pinch larger than the depth and width of my molding stock. Then I used a hole saw to bore a 1-1/2-in.-dia. hole that is offset from the center of the groove. This hole accommodates the router bit, and it should be to the left of the groove as you face the jig.
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Conclusion In reality, calibrating the Dremel Router / Shaper proved to be a bit of a pain, but its likely youll only have to do this once each time you come to do some routing. For sanding and shaping, it provides both a sturdy mount for your rotary tool, and an effective means of using sanding bands as well as a modest-sized worktable for these tasks. The build quality and instructions arent going to win any awards, and wed prefer if a small selection of cutting and sanding bits were included, but for the price we can t really argue with the latter. The real question is how often youll be using it, and how intense the work will be.
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